top of page

New Zealand's TWIICE Revolutionises Coffee Drinking with Edible Cups

In a blend of culinary innovation and environmental stewardship, TWIICE, a New Zealand-based family business, has developed a novel solution to reduce waste in the coffee industry- edible coffee cups.


Launched after years of development, the edible cups aim to offer a sustainable alternative to traditional disposable cups, combining utility with a unique taste experience. This 'creative' initiative is set to make a significant impact in the battle against global waste, particularly in light of Gitnux statistics revealing the staggering global disposal rates of plastic cups.


With more than 500 billion disposable coffee cups drown away annually, the need for a sustainable solution has never been more critical. TWWICE's edible cups offer not just a viable alternative but also an enjoyable one. Engineered to last through your coffee experience without leaking, these cups promise durability and pleasure in equal measure.


The TWIICE, edible cups are crafted to satisfy the palate, they carry the nostalgic taste of a vanilla biscuit, reminiscent of wine biscuits, fortune cookies, or waffle cones, depending on who you ask. To maintain their freshness, the cups are packaged in compostable bags and should be stored in an airtight container upon receipt, ensuring they stay crisp and delicious until it's time to use them.


Source: Twiice - Slider showing vanilla, chocolate and Easter Bun


This inventive idea sprouted from a beach day in 2017, when Aucklanders Jamie, Simone, Stephen, and Theresa Cashmore were struck by the potential of creating a tasty, edible coffee cup that diverged from the bland flavours of seaweed or rice alternatives. Their journey from concept to commercial product involved extensive recipe testing and the eventual upgrade to commercial baking equipment, leading to the launch of the twiice cup.


In 2022, the Cashmores opened a coffee bar at their Eden Terrace headquarters in, Auckland, allowing everyone to experience the twiice cup firsthand. Their efforts to share this innovation have taken them across the UK and Europe, where they sponsored the European Coffee Symposium and participated in multiple events, showcasing their product in prestigious venues such as the Selfridges Food Hall in London and Coutume Cafe in Paris.


Source: Twiice Edible Coffee Cups


TWIICE, edible cups, are not just a testament to the Kiwi innovative spirit but also a step towards a more sustainable and enjoyable coffee-drinking future. As the company continues to expand, the hope is economies of scale will make these eco-friendly cups a staple in coffee culture worldwide.


For more information CLICK HERE


Here are the global disposable coffee cups stats. Are you sitting down?


  • 500 billion disposable coffee cups are used globally each year,

  • 16 billion disposable coffee cups, with 6.5 billion in the United States,

  • Disposable coffee cups’ plastic linings can take 30 years to break down,

  • Only 1 in 400 disposable coffee cups in the UK are recycled,

  • 6.5 million trees are cut down each year for paper cups,

  • 7 million coffee cups are used daily in the UK,

  • 150 disposable cups are used by the average American worker each year,

  • Approximately 1 million single-use coffee cups are sent to landfill every minute,

  • In Australia, 1 billion paper cups end up in landfills each year,

  • Canadians discard over 1.5 billion disposable hot drink cups annually,

  • The average number of coffee cups a person drinks from annually in the UK is 130,

  • Disposable coffee cups account for 12 billion pounds of CO2 greenhouse gas emissions annually,

  • Annually, 20 million trees are cut down for the production of single-use coffee cups,

  • 900 million disposable coffee cups are discarded every year in Germany,

  • Over 100 disposable coffee cups are thrown away every second in the UK alone,

  • Disposable coffee cups produce 3.7 billion pounds of waste each year in their production stage alone Source: Gitnux


Comments

Rated 0 out of 5 stars.
No ratings yet

Add a rating

TOP STORIES

1/53
bottom of page